Other Islands

Paros

ParosArea: 75.79 mi²

Island group: Cyclades

Paros is a Greek island in the central Aegean Sea. One of the Cyclades island group, it lies to the west of Naxos, from which it is separated by a channel about 8 kilometres (5 miles) wide. It lies approximately 100 mi (161 kilometres) south-east of Piraeus. The Municipality of Paros includes numerous uninhabited offshore islets totaling 196.308 square kilometres (75.795 sq mi) of land. Its nearest neighbor is the municipality of Antiparos, which lies to its southwest.

Historically, Paros was known for its fine white marble, which gave rise to the term “Parian” to describe marble or china of similar qualities. Today, abandoned marble quarries and mines can be found on the island, but Paros is primarily known as a popular tourist spot.

Milos
Milos
Area: 61.83 mi²

Island group: Cyclades

Milos or Melos is a volcanic Greek island in the Aegean Sea, just north of the Sea of Crete. Milos is the Southwesternmost Island in the Cyclades group.

The island is famous for the statue of Aphrodite, and also for statues of the Greek god Asclepius (now in the British Museum), the Poseidon and an archaic Apollo in Athens. Milos is a popular tourist destination during the summer. The Municipality of Milos also includes the uninhabited offshore islands of Antimilos and Akradies.

There are about 70 beaches on Milos Island. Hivadolimni Beach is the longest at about 1 kilometre (0.62 mi). The rest of the beaches are starting from (North): Sarakiniko Beach, Papafragas, Kapros, Pachena, Alogomantra, Konstantinos, Mitakas, Mantrakia, Firopotamos, Nerodafni, Lakida, Plathiena, Fourkovouni, Areti, Pollonia, Gourado and Filakopi. (South): Firiplaka, Paliochori, Provatas, Tsigrado, Agia Kyriaki, Psaravolada, Kleftiko, Gerontas, Gerakas, Agios Sostis, Mouchlioti, Katergo, Spathi, Firligos, Pialothiafes, Kalamos, Krotiraki, Psathi, Svoronou and Sakelari. (West): Agios Ioannis, Cave of Sikia, Agathia, Triades and Ammoudaraki. (East): Voudia, Thalassa, Paliorema, Tria Pagidia and Thiafes. (In the Bay Area): Hivadolimni, Lagada, Papikinou, Fatourena, Klima, Skinopi and Patrikia. The North and South and bay beaches are tourist attractions. The east beaches are very quiet, and those to the west are also quiet beaches.

Kos
Area: 287.2 km2

Island group: Cyclades

KosKos or Cos is a Greek island, part of the Dodecanese island chain in the southeastern Aegean Sea, off the Anatolian coast of Turkey. Kos is the third largest of the Dodecanese by area, after Rhodes and Karpathos; it has a population of 33,388 (2011 census), making it the second most populous of the Dodecanese, after Rhodes. The island measures 40 by 8 kilometres (25 by 5 miles), and is 4 km (2 miles) from the coast of the ancient region of Caria in Turkey. Administratively, Kos constitutes a municipality within the Kos regional unit, which is part of the South Aegean region. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Kos town. According to the Greek mythology, Kos is the sacred land of Asclepius, the god of healing. Archaeological findings prove that the history of Kos starts from the prehistoric times.

The main religion practiced is Greek Orthodoxy. Kos has one of the four cathedrals in the entire Dodecanese.

The island has a 14th-century fortress at the entrance to its harbour, erected in 1315 by the Knights Hospitaller, and another from the Byzantine period in Antimachia.

The most popular beach of Kos is Paradise beach, a beautiful and sandy beach where you will find sun beds, water sports and an ideal place for families with children. Agios Stefanos Beach is a well-organized sandy beach, 38 km west of Kos. Elia beach is an isolated beach with scattered rocks. Ammos is a long, sandy beach, 5 km north of Kos. Kamares is a long, sandy beach, 42 km southeast of Kos. Kefalos Beach is a sandy beach located 43 kilometers southwest of the capital city and is preferred by windsurfers. Psalidi is a beach with pebbles and is located 5 km south of Kos. Approximately 8 km west of the town of Kos you will find the beach of Tigaki, a large and organized sandy beach. If you want to find a quiet beach, you should look in the west side of the island.

Samos
Area: 184.4 mi²

SamosIsland group: North Aegean islands

Samos is a Greek island in the eastern Aegean Sea, south of Chios, north of Patmos and the Dodecanese, and off the coast of Asia Minor, from which it is separated by the 1.6-kilometre (1.0 mi)-wide Mycale Strait. It is also a separate regional unit of the North Aegean region, and the only municipality of the regional unit.

In ancient times Samos was a particularly rich and powerful city-state, particularly known for its vineyards and wine production. It is home to Pythagoreion and the Heraion of Samos, a UNESCO World Heritage Site that includes the Eupalinian aqueduct, a marvel of ancient engineering. Samos is the birthplace of the Greek philosopher and mathematician Pythagoras, after whom the Pythagorean Theorem is named, the philosopher Epicurus, and the astronomer Aristarchus of Samos, the first known individual to propose that the Earth revolves around the sun. Samian wine was well known in antiquity, and is still produced on the island.

The island was governed by the semi-autonomous Principality of Samos under Ottoman suzerainty from 1835 until it joined Greece in 1912. Its climate is mild and wet in winter and dry in summer.

Delos
Area: 1.324 mi²

DelosIsland group: Cyclades

The island of Delos near Mykonos, near the centre of the Cyclades archipelago, is one of the most important mythological, historical and archaeological sites in Greece. The excavations in the island are among the most extensive in the Mediterranean; ongoing work takes place under the direction of the French School at Athens and many of the artifacts found are on display at the Archaeological Museum of Delos and the National Archaeological Museum of Athens. The mythological birthplace of Apollo, it was a major religious center and port during the 1st millennium B.C. The island’s ruins encompass Doric temples, markets, an amphitheater, houses with mosaics and the iconic Terrace of the Lions statues.

Delos had a position as a holy sanctuary for a millennium before Olympian Greek mythology made it the birthplace of Apollo and Artemis. From its Sacred Harbour, the horizon shows the two conical mounds that have identified landscapes sacred to a goddess in other sites: one, retaining its pre-Greek name Mount Kynthos, is crowned with a sanctuary of Zeus.

Skiathos
Area: 19.27 mi²

Island group: Sporades

SkiathosSkiathos is a small Greek island in the northwest Aegean Sea. Skiathos is the westernmost island in the Northern Sporades group, east of the Pelion peninsula in Magnesia on the mainland, and west of the island of Skopelos. It is is part of the Sporades archipelago. It’s best known for its beaches and buzzing, youth-driven nightlife scene. The action centers around Skiathos Town, where bars and restaurants spill onto sidewalks along the old harbor and Papadiamanti street, the main pedestrian thoroughfare. Between town and the airport are many open-air, waterfront clubs.

There is a regular boat service to the island and the rest of the Sporades islands with departures from Volos and Agios Konstantinos. The boats are operated mainly by Hellenic Seaways using its high-speed Flying Cat vessels as well as conventional ferries. There are three bus routes on the island. The core route is from the main town to Koukounaries beach which travels along the south coast of the island.

Skiathos is noted among the Greek islands for its profusion of soft sand beaches. The whole south coast of this small island is a succession of sandy coves, most now given over to heavy commercialism. Quiet and deserted coves are few, with the Kalamaki Peninsula offering the best chance of a day away from the crowds. The few north coast beaches have avoided the exploitation seen in the south but they are less easy to reach.

Lefkada
Area: 129.7 mi²

Island group: Sporades

LefkasLefkada, or Leucas or Leucadia or Lefkas or Leukas is a Greek island in the Ionian Sea on the west coast of Greece, connected to the mainland by a long causeway and floating bridge. The principal town of the island and seat of the municipality is Lefkada. It is situated on the northern part of the island, approximately 1 hour by automobile away from Aktion National Airport. The island is part of the regional unit of Lefkada.

The island has a typical Mediterranean climate: hot summers and cool winters, especially in the mountains.

Apart from crystal clear blue sea and spectacular beaches, there are numerous other attractions in Lefkada including plentiful natural beauties, historic sites, museums and monasteries, and most important must see of the Lefkas island include: Nydri; the mediaeval Venetian castle of Agia Mavra; prehistorical city of Nirikos; Lefkata cape; Monastery of Faneromeni,the most important religious centre of Lefkada; the Archeological Museum; Agios Ioanis Antzoussis Church;  Waterfalls of Dimosari and numerous other tourist attractions.

There are a plenty of beautiful sandy beaches on the island, but the most popular include Porto Katsiki, 45km southwest of Lefkada town, near Lefkata cape, accessible by the 347 steps sloping of the mountain and Egremni Beach, located about 30km from Lefkada’s capital, surrounded by imposing cliffs. The both beaches are well organized, with umbrellas, sun beds and beach bars. Other notable beaches on the island include Kathisma, Agios Ioannis, Nydri, Ammoglossa and Poros Beach.

Ios Island
Ios
Area: 42.09 mi²

Island group: Cyclades

Ios is a Greek island in the Cyclades group in the Aegean Sea. Ios is a hilly island with cliffs down to the sea on most sides, situated halfway between Naxos and Santorini. The Port of Ios is at the head of the Ormos harbor in the northwest. From there the bus or a 15-minute walk up the steep donkey path takes you to the village, known as Chora. Chora is a white and very picturesque cycladic village, full of stairs and narrow paths that make it inaccessible for cars of any kind. Apart from the port and the village of Chora, Ios has only a few small settlements, just a group of spread out houses in the background of major beaches (Theodoti, Kalamos, Manganari).

Ios attracts a large number of young tourists, many of whom used to sleep on their sleeping bags during the 1970s on the popular beach of Mylopotas after partying through the night. Today Mylopotas beach has been developed to an equivalent mass package tourism resort like Platys Gialos and Paradise Beach of Mykonos.

The most important of Íos’ 365 churches is Panayia Gremiótissa, standing on Hóra’s highest spot. It is built literally on the edge of a cliff, affording an amazing view of the open sea. This place is the centre of one of the biggest religious feasts on the island, taking place on August 15, and involving a procession in Hóra with the icon of the Mother of God placed at the forefront. Later on, a traditional festival takes place with local island-style singing and dancing till dawn.

Comments are closed.